StyleOnTheCouch Loves: Intimacy (Friday Lingerie Lust)

Intimacy 2.0 is the second innovative fashion venture by Dutch digital design lab Studio Roosegaarde, exploring the relationship between intimacy and technology.  It’s a wonderful interplay of fashion, psychology and physiology, the power of human attraction, design and technology that is perfect for a Friday feature.

A collaboration between Daan Roosegaarde and designer Anouk Wipprecht, the duo created high-tech dresses from leather and conductive, ‘smart’ e-foils.  In the first Intimacy series, the e-foils reacted to the presence of other people – heat sensors embedded within the design would respond to the proximity of others (or alternatively any other source of heat like a radiator, so watch out) and would cause the e-foils to go transparent.

In Intimacy 2.0 both the theory and the designs have developed somewhat.  The garments become increasingly transparent based on close and personal encounters with others in what the designers feel is a ‘sensual display of disclosure….‘  This time, the dresses respond to the wearer’s emotional stimuli in relation to others as opposed to merely reacting to external stimuli: a dress changes colour according to the heartbeat of the woman wearing it.  What this means is that an attraction bringing about an elevated heartbeat or an encounter that leaves your heart racing could result in your potential suitor getting more than he ever bargained for….

The dresses themselves are highly futuristic and sci-fi looking, with plunging necklines and also a noticably fragile, robotic/erotic look.  An interview with Wipprecht on the Fashioning Tech website highlighted her idea of creating a ‘second skin’ in the meeting of technology and fashion:

“I tend to create my designs towards soft sci-fi statements, in my mind technology should become more fragile and second-skin like than bulky and robotic. I like to think in ways of embryonic, organic and symbiosis. That’s why I like to experiment with fluids and foils coupled to responsive sensory systems rather than reacting led’s and displays” – Anouk Wipprecht

Whilst I see this series as a very conceptual one, I understand that Studio Roosegaarde is aiming to collaborate further with fashion designers.  I leave the last word to Wipprecht, who believes that, “Our society will get more sensory based and as soon as we adapt that into our system, intelligent clothing will be booming“.  It’s an interesting thought that human tactics of flirting and attraction – wooing messages, dinner dates and the gift of flowers may become obsolete, yet maybe even with these dresses, the art of ‘the gaze’ and love at first sight may assume greater significance….

Have a lovely Easter weekend, Blog Reader, StyleOnTheCouch xo

Photos: Studio Roosegaard.  Many thanks to my friend who sent me some information about this project as a perfect mix of my greatest passions!
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Comments

  1. says

    What an utterly unusual design concept – the results are visually stunning, and I’m particularly intrigued by the materials used to create them. But I have to admit that I perceive them to be far closer to art than genuine fashion. I have vivid recollections of being a young teen (in the era when snap pants were high fashion) and reading about designers who thought that clothing was going to evolve into something more intelligent and technological. I thought it was a bit silly then, and I don’t see it as much more realistic now. Clothing is, at the end of the day, about what is wearable and practical – and if it’s pretty, too, that’s a bonus. Call me crazy, but I think this collection would look much more natural in a museum than a boutique :)
    xox,
    Cee

  2. says

    wow, that a look at that “construction” work on those body of art fashion pieces.. adore! so innovative and original, indeed! xo Happy Easter Holidays! xo

    • says

      I think they are very conceptual but actually I am interested in the future of fabrics, I think we’re becoming more interested in the touch and feel of what we wear, so why not intelligent fabrics? Maybe our grandchildren will be wearing them lol

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